Charles Long & The Contemporary Austin Present SXSW Music Showcase

Written by Rory Burbeck | February 25, 2014

Charles Long Exhibit at The Contemporary Austin

Effervescently combining the visual and audio arts, The Contemporary Austin is opening its doors to Charles Long’s CATALIN exhibition for all Music Badge holders during SXSW Music (March 11-16), as well as presenting an electronic music showcase at the Jones Center location (700 Congress Ave) on Friday, March 14 beginning at 8:00PM.

For this special collaboration between The Contemporary Austin, SXSW, and artist Charles Long, four sound acts take over and respond to CATALIN, Long’s multi-sensory, immersive installation currently on view at the Jones Center. The performers will activate the second floor of the museum, capturing the seductive allure of CATALIN and adding a fresh aural element to the gallery’s haunted nightclub feel. With artwork and performances fully integrated in real time, this official SXSW Showcase makes for a truly unique art and music experience.

The showcase lineup features four DJs on the cutting edge of experimental electronic music:

8:00PM - 8prn
9:00PM - Paradise
10:00PM - Kodak to Graph
11:00PM - Palmbomen

Blending sculpture, film, audio and more, this isn’t the first time Long has included music in his exhibitions, and Long will further his diverse artistic style as part of SXSW this year. He was the artistic force behind the Amorphous Body Study Center, a popular audio-visual collaboration been Long and British indie band Stereolab in the mid-1990s. The artists created an EP together that was used as part of the exhibit.

The performance is open to SXSW badge and wristband holders. Limited tickets will be released to the general public prior to the performance.

SXSW badge holders receive free admission to The Contemporary Austin for the duration of the festival.

IMAGE: Charles Long, CATALIN, 2014. Installation view, The Contemporary Austin – Jones Center, Austin. Courtesy the artists and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery. Photograph by Brian Fitzsimmons.