SXSW Eco Hackathon Sign Up Now Open

Written by Jordan Roberts | August 28, 2014

Danaus plexippus Monarch butterfly on flower in the Mindo-Nambillo Reserve at approximately 1500 meters, Andes mountains, western Ecuador – Photo by © Kevin Schafer / WWF-Canon

Calling all environmentally-conscious hackers – the SXSW Eco Hackathon Presented by World Wildlife Fund needs your help to save the beautiful and iconic monarch butterfly!

Each year monarchs travel nearly 3,000 miles from the United States and Canada to the central Mexican forests – farther than any other tropical butterfly. Recent research has found the monarch population is the lowest it has been in the last two decades. With many contributing factors to this decline, the biggest threat is the widespread extermination along the monarch’s long migratory route of milkweed, a flowering plant critical to monarch butterfly reproduction and development. Monarch butterflies – like bees, bats, birds and other pollinators – affect 35 percent of the world’s crop production. A world without butterflies would significantly impact food production, a risk that we cannot take as we approach a planet of 9 billion people.

This is where you – the hacker – come in! Using data provided by Monarch Joint Venture and others, SXSW Eco is challenging hackers to spend 24 hours creating useable tools (websites or mobile apps) that will help the public participate in monarch conservation. Every hacker will receive a complimentary registration to SXSW Eco. Don't miss this opportunity to meet other sustainably-minded hackers, build a portfolio, team-build next to other industry leaders and have a fun time! For more information visit sxsweco.com/hackathon.

Sign up today!

SXSW Eco and WWF Hackathon

Register to attend SXSW Eco 2014 before the next registration deadline on September 12. Stay connected with SXSW Eco on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Instagram for announcements, updates, contests and more!

Danaus plexippus Monarch butterfly on flower in the Mindo-Nambillo Reserve at approximately 1500 meters, Andes mountains, western Ecuador – Photo by © Kevin Schafer / WWF-Canon